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Here is a list of my all-time favorite Comcast Negotiation tips

  1. Ask for discounts, rather than promotions
    Straight-up discounts are better than promotions because promotions normally add services, which add tax, equipment charges, and/or other fees, which increase your bill. So if you’re offered a promo, ask for a discount instead.
  2. The more you pay, the more Comcast want to keep you as a customer
    Comcast wants to retain all of its customers, but they are desperate to keep the ones who pay the most. Use this knowledge to your advance. If you have a premium package or pay more than $300, know that they really, really want to keep you.
  3. Price discrimination is real, and Comcast does it
    Simply put, Comcast wants to charge you as much as possible, without losing your business. But because they don’t know how much that is, they raise, and raise, and raise your rates until you complain. Use this as motivation to proactively negotiate your best rate.
  4. Call during off-peak hours
    You will reach customer service representatives faster if you call when they are not busy. I have the best luck calling weekdays 9-11am.
  5. Be nice (likable even)
    It’ll go a long way. These rep’s get yelled at all day, and your kindness will be a breath of fresh air. I know it will be hard, and sometimes impossible, but I’ve achieved all my best deals being nice, asking lots of questions, and staying resolved to get a great rate.
  6. Don’t take the first offer
    This is an obvious one – do not accept the first offer.
  7. Use ‘incognito’ mode to view current Comcast deals
    Want to really know what Comcast is offering new customers? To do this from your computer, use incognito mode. This will allow you to browse in private, and ill show what Comcast is really offering. Otherwise, the cookies on your computer block those offers.
  8. The retention team has the authority to offer the best discounts
    Customer service representatives have different levels of authority, and access to offer different discounts/promotions. Front-line reps have access to very few, if any other offers. Their managers will have access to a few, but the retention team is specifically designed to ‘save’ business, and therefore have the best offers.
  9. Know what competitors are offering new customers
    This is meaningful information when negotiating. As a customer, you have options. I could go there and pay xx, so I want to get a comparable rate, can you help me?
  10. Even if Comcast is your only option, there is still room to negotiate
    First, always suggest you have other options. Often the reps won’t know or will be unsure. The retention team is a national team, and they don’t know every nook and cranny of the country. But even if they do, you can always cancel, and they don’t want that.
  11. To make canceling service easy: say you’re moving out of the country
    Stick to your guns on this, and insist you are canceling because you’re moving. Otherwise, you may get a stubborn rep how makes it impossible to cancel.
  12. Loyal customers pay more. But only…
    Every thought about that. Longstanding loyal customers pay more than new ones. Doesn’t really seem like it should work like that, but it does. I go out of my way to ask why? I’ve never really gotten a good answer, but it’s always nice to point out that it could pay to leave.
  13. Negotiates rates are the best
    If you don’t want all the hassle, you can hire a bill negotiation service to do all the work for you. Like me at Bills180 (check out the link to see my picture). I take care of everything for you. All I need is your bill and some basic information, and I’ll make these calls for you.
  14. You can complain, but most often it’ll be a waste of your time.
    If you don’t get what you want, or someone is rude, simply hang up, and call back. You will get no satisfaction from complaining. However, if you do, use this escalation path to complain.
  15. Shy about negotiating? Use good spouse/bad spouse
    Call up and say “my spouse says the bill is too high. I have to cancel…unless I can go back to her with a better rate.” They offer something, say “no, my spouse won’t think that’s enough savings.” This is a good strategy because you and the rep are on the same side.
  16. NO discount is truly yours, until its confirmed
    The next day, check online to ensure you are getting exactly what was discussed. Call back if you don’t see it listed.
  17. Retention Teams Go By Many Names
    Make sure you speak with the team that has the most authority to help you. This is the retention team, but they may go by other names: cancellation department, customer loyalty team, or retention team.
  18. Threaten to cancel, and you’ll get the best offers
    If they fear losing your business, you’ll be connected to the retention team, and offer some pretty good deals. Just be sure to say, you’re canceling because the bill is too high.
  19. Speak to a manager
    I always ask the rep if their manager has access to more options, or how often does a manager help achieve a better deal or something along those lines. I am almost asking permission, as I try to keep things amicable. I always try to be courteous with this, as its a privilege to speak to a manager, not a right.
  20. Ask for email/text, detailing account changes – while on the line
    IF you can get this – great! Document, document, document. Although, I’ve not got this often.
  21. Technology is getting cheaper, but your bill gets higher
    I always like to ask this questions. But of course, most know, it’s about profits.
  22. BONUS TIP: On a low or low fixed income? 
    Yes, that’s right.  There’s an option for that.  Comcast has a few options for those that have a very low income.

What do you think of my Comcast negoiation tips?  Did any of these tips help you?  Did you successfully implement any?  If so, please leave me a note in the comments section below.

 

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Will Verizon Lower My Bill if I Threaten to Cancel?

 

Mike Mozart (https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeepersmedia/) CC by 2.0